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Abstract

The Uruguay Round of negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) may draw agriculture into an unprecedented global liberalization process. If developed nations write the agenda for these negotiations and direct the research on economic effects of liberalization, they are likely to underplay several impacts which fall primarily on LDC's. This paper identifies several ways in which the history, structure, or economic power of LDC's precipitate different consequences from liberalization than would arise in developed nations. These points ought to be recognized at the GATT both because the negotiations will affect their resolution and because they will affect the coalitions and compromises LDC's bring to the GATT.

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