Bacterial Foodborne Disease: Medical Costs and Productivity Losses

Microbial pathogens in food cause an estimated 6.5-33 million cases of human illness and up to 9,000 deaths in the United States each year. Over 40 different foodborne microbial pathogens, including fungi, viruses, parasites, and bacteria, are believed to cause human illnesses. For six bacterial pathogens, the costs of human illness are estimated to be $9.3-$12.9 billion annually. Of these costs, $2.9-$6.7 billion are attributed to foodborne bacteria. These estimates were developed to provide analytical support for USDA's Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems rule for meat and poultry. (Note that the parasite Toxoplasma gondii is not included in this report.) To estimate medical costs and productivity losses, ERS uses four severity categories for acute illnesses: those who did not visit a physician, visited a physician, were hospitalized, or died prematurely. The lifetime consequences of chronic disease are included in the cost estimates for E. coli O157:H7 and fetal listeriosis.


Issue Date:
1996
Publication Type:
Report
DOI and Other Identifiers:
Record Identifier:
https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/33991
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/33991
Total Pages:
93
Series Statement:
Agricultural Economics Report No. 741




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2019-08-26

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