000007965 001__ 7965
000007965 005__ 20180910200910.0
000007965 037__ $$a349-2016-17919
000007965 041__ $$aen
000007965 245__ $$aCurbing Agricultural Exceptionalism: The EU's Response To External Challenge
000007965 260__ $$c2007
000007965 269__ $$a2007
000007965 300__ $$a7
000007965 336__ $$aConference Paper/ Presentation
000007965 446__ $$aEnglish
000007965 490__ $$aConference Paper
000007965 520__ $$aFrom the launch of GATT in 1948, through to the Uruguay Round of GATT negotiations, the niceties of international trade rules had little impact on the design and implementation of EU farm policies. GATT was built on consensus, but powerful economic actors (such as the EU) were to a large extent able to implement farm policies that best suited their perceived needs. This agricultural exceptionalism (a term used by political scientists) had been promoted by the US in the 1940s and 1950s, but was cultivated by the EU (and others) in the 1960s and 1970s. However, dating from the Punta del Este declaration of 1986 launching the Uruguay Round, agricultural exceptionalism has been under pressure and the Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture of 1994 (the URAA) did, to some extent, curb agricultural exceptionalism and continues so doing through the WTO dispute settlement body.
000007965 650__ $$aInternational Relations/Trade
000007965 700__ $$aSwinbank, Alan
000007965 700__ $$aDaugbjerg, Carsten
000007965 8564_ $$s57035$$uhttp://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/7965/files/cp07sw01.pdf
000007965 887__ $$ahttp://purl.umn.edu/7965
000007965 909CO $$ooai:ageconsearch.umn.edu:7965$$pGLOBAL_SET
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  Previous issue date: 2007
000007965 982__ $$gAgricultural Economics Society>81st Annual Conference, April 2-4, 2007, Reading University, UK
000007965 980__ $$a349