TIMBER HARVEST ADJACENCY ECONOMIES, HUNTING, SPECIES PROTECTION, AND OLD GROWTH VALUE: SEEKING THE OPTIMUM

Spatial forest management models recognize that nontimber benefits cat1 be influenced by the status of adjacent land. For instance, contiguous old growth provides habitat, aesthetic value, and environmental services. Conversely, edge areas provide forage and cover habitat for game and non-game wildlife. However, adjacency externalities are not limited to nontimber concerns. Larger harvest areas generate average cost savings as fixed harvesting costs are spread across greater acreage, a problem excluded from most literature on optimal harvesting. Hence, it is typical that economies and diseconomies of adjacency in harvesting occur simultaneously. This complicates the determination of optimal ecosystem management behavior, which recognizes timber, aesthetic, wildlife protection, and hunting values. This paper conceptually portrays economies of adjacency in competing objectives using multiple management strategies.


Issue Date:
2000
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/7233
Total Pages:
59
Series Statement:
Working paper
2000-10




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-23

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