Complements and Meat Demand in the U.S.

In this study we estimated the price elasticities among meats, vegetables, grains, and potatoes and the impact that different levels of income have on the demand for these commodities. The 2005 Nielsen retail home scan data were used to construct a censored demand system of 14 equations. Results revealed that the uncompensated cross-price elasticities for both low and high-incomes suggest both substitution and complement relationships, while the compensated price elasticities are dominated primarily by substitution relationships. Our findings also revealed that expenditure elasticities among both low and high-income households differ for most commodities.


Issue Date:
2008
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/6406
Total Pages:
28
JEL Codes:
C25; D12; Q11
Series Statement:
Selected Paper
469593




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-23

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