GOING WEST IN THE EUROPEAN UNION: MIGRATION AND EU ENLARGEMENT

Citizens of EU Member States have the fundamental right of free movement within the EU Union, and of freely choosing where to live and work within the EU. However, this right was temporarily constrained for citizens of the new Member States following the enlargement of the EU from 15 to 27 Member States. The severity of restrictions for newcomers varied substantially across the 15 old Member States. This paper analyzes whether the variations in entry restrictions influenced the distribution of migrants across the EU-15 states. To assess the effects of entry restrictions, it models and compares the distribution of migrants across the EU-15 countries prior to the enlargement with that after the enlargement. The analysis uses aggregate data on migrant stocks and migrant flows from the new Member States to the EU-15 states. The results suggest that the migration policies only had a very weak effect and did not create a new migration regime. The destination preferences of past emigrants from the East are by and large replicated by migrants who came after their home countries became members of the EU.


Issue Date:
2010
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/58946
Total Pages:
20 pages
JEL Codes:
J11; J61
Series Statement:
Working Paper
10-4




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-25

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