State executions, deterrence, and the incidence of murder

This study employs a panel of U.S. state-level data over the years 1978-1997 to estimate the deterrent effect of capital punishment. Particular attention is paid to problems of endogeneity bias arising from the non-random assignment of death penalty laws across states and a simultaneous relationship between murders and the deterrence probabilities. The primary innovation of the analysis lies in the estimation of a simultaneous equations system whose identification is based upon the employment of instrumental variables motivated by the theory of public choice. The estimation results suggest that structural estimates of the deterrent effect of capital punishment are likely to be downward biased due to the influence of simultaneity. Correcting for simultaneity, the estimates imply that a state execution deters approximately fourteen murders per year on average. Finally, the results also suggest that the announcement effect of capital punishment, as opposed to the existence of a death penalty provision, is the mechanism actually driving the deterrent effect associated with state executions.


Issue Date:
2004-05
Publication Type:
Journal Article
DOI and Other Identifiers:
Print ISSN 1514-0326 (Other)
Online ISSN 1667-6726 (Other)
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/43889
Published in:
Journal of Applied Economics, Volume 07, Number 1
Page range:
163-193
Total Pages:
31
JEL Codes:
K42; H00




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-25

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