INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT MOTIVATIONS OF U.S. WINERIES

This study used personal and telephone interviews of wine industry executives and observers to examine the foreign direct investment motivations of U.S. wineries. Underlying most winery motivations was the recognition that U.S. wineries sense increasing pressure to offer a competitive range of wines that meet the price/quality needs of consumers and retailers in important markets and market segments. Wineries' marketing plans are often constrained by their ability to obtain adequate grape and juice supplies that meet important price and quality criteria, especially when domestic grape production drops. The importance of product portfolios and the industry's resource dependence have placed tremendous pressures on U.S. wineries to coordinate winegrape and juice acquisitions, especially as retailers consolidate their supply chains. Some U.S. wineries have invested abroad in response to these pressures while others have not. Interview results suggest that foreign investments by U.S. wineries were primarily motivated by the need for greater access to stable or adequate winegrape/juice supplies, the need for more control over the winegrape costs within given quality levels, and the desire to expand wine portfolios.


Issue Date:
1999
Publication Type:
Journal Article
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/34347
Published in:
International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, Volume 02, Issue 1
Page range:
47-62
Total Pages:
16




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-25

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