000032792 001__ 32792
000032792 005__ 20180122204832.0
000032792 037__ $$a1497-2016-130670
000032792 041__ $$aen
000032792 245__ $$aIMPORTANCE OF INCOME IN COW-CALF MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTIVITY
000032792 260__ $$c1998
000032792 269__ $$a1998
000032792 270__ $$mNAHMSweb@usda.gov$$pOtt,   Stephen L.
000032792 300__ $$a4
000032792 336__ $$aReport
000032792 446__ $$aEnglish
000032792 490__ $$aInfo Sheet, Veterinary Services
000032792 520__ $$aThe USDA's National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) collected data on management practices and cow-calf herds as a source of family income from a representative sample of cow-calf producers from 23 of the leading cow-calf states.  Overall, 2,713 producers with one or more beef cows participated in the NAHMS Beef '97 Study, representing 85.7 percent of the beef cows and 77.6 percent of the beef cow operations in the United States as of January 1997. Producers whose cow-calf herds were the primary source of family income were more productive than those whose herds were a supplemental source of income. Cow-calf herds were the primary source of income for 14 percent of the producers and provided supplemental income for 69 percent of the producers. While average herd size was larger for primary income herds, nearly half of the herds with 100 or more cows were non-primary income herds. Producers whose herds were a primary source of income were more likely to dehorn cattle, castrate bull calves, and practice artificial insemination and semen testing than producers whose herds were not a primary source of income. Primary income producers were also more likely to vaccinate preweaned calves. Due to greater weaning rates and a higher weaning percentage, primary income producers produced more pounds of weaned calf per exposed cow than did non-primary income producers (440 vs. 400 pounds).

Contact for this paper:  Stephen Ott
000032792 650__ $$aLivestock Production/Industries
000032792 6531_ $$aNAHMS
000032792 6531_ $$abeef
000032792 6531_ $$acattle
000032792 6531_ $$acow-calf
000032792 6531_ $$aepidemiology
000032792 6531_ $$aeconomics
000032792 6531_ $$amarketing
000032792 6531_ $$amanagement
000032792 6531_ $$aproduction
000032792 6531_ $$aincome
000032792 6531_ $$adehorning
000032792 6531_ $$acastration
000032792 6531_ $$avaccinations
000032792 6531_ $$abreeding
000032792 6531_ $$acalving
000032792 6531_ $$asemen testing
000032792 700__ $$aOtt, Stephen L.
000032792 8564_ $$s45893$$uhttp://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/32792/files/info03.pdf
000032792 887__ $$ahttp://purl.umn.edu/32792
000032792 909CO $$ooai:ageconsearch.umn.edu:32792$$pGLOBAL_SET
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info03.pdf: 45893 bytes, checksum: db8723a88f77ec4a93437d3d8cbffc00 (MD5)
  Previous issue date: 1998
000032792 982__ $$gUnited States Department of Agriculture>National Animal Health Monitoring System>Info Sheets
000032792 980__ $$a1497