MEASURING AND EXPLAINING THE DECLINE IN U.S. COTTON PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH

Tornquist input quantity indices were used to derive total and partial factor productivity measures for U.S. cotton across time, region, and scale. Total factor productivity for U.S. cotton increased .2 percent per year between 1974 and 1982. Partial productivity measures revealed that yield growth was about .6 percent and input use grew about .4 percent per year. Cotton enterprises in Alabama and Mississippi gained and those in the Texas High Plains lost competitive advantage relative to California. In 1982, very large (1750-5900 acres) and large (950-1749 acres) cotton enterprises were 2 percent more productive than medium-size enterprises (570-949 acres).


Issue Date:
1991-07
Publication Type:
Journal Article
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/30305
Published in:
Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Volume 23, Number 1
Page range:
105-120
Total Pages:
16




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-24

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