EFFECT OF DAYLENGTH ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTERSPECIFIC PENNISETUM HYBRIDS

Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L. Leeke) x napiergrass (P. purpureum Schum.) interspecific hybrids (PMN) have great potential as a forage crop in the tropics. The effect of daylength on the flowering of cytoplasmic-nuclear male sterile (cms) pearl millet Tifton 23 A4, and three napiergrasses (N14, N20, and N74) was determined in monthly plantings for a period of one year. Fifty days after planting, the male parents (napiergrass) were cut to the ground level (Tl), to one meter aboveground (T2), or not cut (T3). Days from planting to flowering (PF) for pearl millet ranged from 44 to 47 across plantings and 50 or less for N14 and N74 (from August to December). Although flowering of the male parents was not influenced by the T2 and T3 treatments, the Tl treatment caused plants to flower later. With the exception of the Tl treatment, flower response to daylength was as expected. Seed of the PMN can be obtained from August through December in Puerto Rico but not during long days of (12 hours of day light or more) unless day-neutral male parents are used.


Issue Date:
Jul 31 1994
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
Language:
English
Total Pages:
8




 Record created 2017-07-07, last modified 2017-08-29

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