GERMPLASM EVALUATION PROJECT FOR TROPICAL LEAF VEGETABLES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

The increased consumption of new and exotic vegetables of tropical origin such as dasheen {Colocasia esculenta L. Schott.) and amaranth {Amaranthus spp,) has stimulated great interest for research on diese crops. Tropical and specialty green leaf vegetables are a major group of horticultural crops that have been the focus of attention in national symposia on new crops. The U.S. imported significant amounts of tropical green leaf vegetables during die past 5 to 8 years, and this trend will likely continue. Some of these crops can be grown in the U.S., but factors such as scarcity of seeds and planting materials coupled with inadequate information on cultural management practices limit the production of these crops in the U.S. The University of the Virgin tslands has initialed a research project lo collect and evaluate germplasm of tropical leaf vegetables with market potential. The approach of this project includes: 1) germplasm collection and evaluation; 2) development of sustainable crop management and cropping systems and 3) conservation and maintenance of germplasm materials. Preliminary field evaluation trial indicates that Malabar spinach (Basella spp.)', water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk,); potato greens {ipomoea batatas L„ Lam); and jute mallow {Carchorus olitorius L.) showed potential yields comparable to yields of common leaf vegetables such as collard (5. oleracea L,. Acephala); and mustard green {B. juncea L,, Czerniak). Multiple harvests from these crops during the growing season resulted in fresh edible yields ranging from 3.22 Id 52,0 g m"2 day'1.


Issue Date:
Jul 07 1996
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
Record Identifier:
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/257033
Language:
English
Total Pages:
14




 Record created 2017-05-10, last modified 2018-01-23

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