AREA-WIDE MANAGEMENT OF ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID IN FLORIDA

Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) vectors the citrus greening disease also known as huanglongbing (HLB). Vector control is a key strategy for managing this disease, even in infected trees. Oviposition and nymphal development occur in young flush, so flushing patterns drive ACP populations. Adults survive on mature foliage in the absence of flush and are most vulnerable to insecticidal control during long periods of tree dormancy. Significant reduction in the populations has been documented for up to six months following a single application of broad spectrum insecticide during winter in Florida. Beneficial insects such as ladybeetles and lacewings add an important component of pest mortality that should also be conserved. Insecticide sprays during the dormant season impart the additional advantage of minimizing the negative impacts on many beneficial insects that are inactive, cryptic, or not present in citrus groves during these dormant periods. The larger the area sprayed, the more effective is the treatment. Cooperative sprays during winter in southwest Florida covered an excess of 100,000 acres of citrus, more than 70,000 of which were applied by fixed-wing aircraft with excellent results. During the growing season, it is best to base spray decisions on ACP population trends for which an accurate and rapid monitoring program is required. A stem tap procedure, coupled with flush inspection, has provided good results for both research and management purposes. Present efforts are focused on establishing thresholds for ACP control and organizing a web-based platform for managing real time data on psyllid populations for growers and consultants.


Issue Date:
2010
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/254118
Total Pages:
17




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-29

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