TOWARDS ERADICATION OF GIANT AFRICAN SNAIL ACHATINA FULICA BOWDICH IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

The giant African snail (Achatina fulica) is a serious plant pest and is listed in the world's worst 100 invasive alien species. It is reported to feed on about 500 species of plants. In October 2008 the pest was discovered in Trinidad at Alyce Glen, in the Diego Martin Valley, which is in the northwest of the island. Delimiting surveys indicated that the pest was confined to an area <1.0 km2; therefore, eradication strategies were implemented in November 2008. A four-pronged approach was initiated to eradicate A. fulica, including surveillance, collection and destruction of snails, application of snail baits and public education. Additionally, recommendations were made to declare A. fulica a "Notifiable Pest" by legislation. More than 1400 snails were collected in November and December 2008 and between May and August 2009, the pest was found at three other locations (Goodwood Gardens, Blue Range and Westmoorings) within the Diego Martin Valley, where the collection of snails and baiting continued. Approximately 5833 snails were collected over a 17-month period, from November 2008 to March 2010. More than 1000 properties including drains, empty lots and parks were surveyed. Island-wide surveillance indicated that the snail was contained in the Diego Martin Valley. About 10,000 cumulative properties were treated with 2.0 tonnes of snail bait containing 3.0% metaldehyde, some properties more than 28 times. By March 2010 no snails were being sighted, all of which could be due to the severity of the drought period and the action taken. The eradication programme is promising success. Monitoring and public awareness are ongoing exercises.


Issue Date:
2010
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/254115
Total Pages:
11




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-12-11

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