TESTING THE FISH INVASIVENESS SCORING KIT (FISK) AS A SCREENING TOOL FOR FLORIDA

Interest in risk analysis for non-native freshwater fishes and other organisms is increasing. Unfortunately, complete risk analysis for a single species is data-intensive, time-consuming, and expensive. A relatively quick and simple screening process may be able to identify species as low or high risk and other species where the risk level is more moderate or uncertain. The Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit (FISK) was developed in the United Kingdom (UK) as a screening tool to assess potential invasiveness of non-native freshwater fishes. The method is semi-quantitative and provides a scoring framework for biogeographical, historical, biological, and ecological information on a species. Higher scores indicate higher risk. We created a list of non-native freshwater fishes introduced into peninsular Florida, scored two sample species using the online FISK toolkit, and determined risk categories for each species based on original and UKcalibrated FISK. Over 120 fish species were introduced into peninsular Florida, with 33 currently reproducing. Barramundi Lates calcarifer, a species not introduced into open waters but used in Florida aquaculture, scored high risk in the FISK. This agreed with a recent risk assessment of the species in Florida. Nevertheless, the score was only a minimal value for high risk in the UKcalibrated FISK. Zebra danio Danio rerio scores were at the minimum value for "evaluate further." Previous risk assessment in Florida considered zebra danio to be very low risk. Lack of variation between two scorers for both species suggested that scorers with different levels of experience can come to a similar conclusion using FISK. Future work will evaluate the remaining species, calibrate the scoring thresholds for Florida, and develop a web-based tool of the modified Florida FISK.


Issue Date:
2011
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/253820
Total Pages:
9




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-29

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