Variation in Organic Standards Prior to the National Organic Program

Interest in establishing nationally uniform certification, labeling, and management standards for organic products grew out of concern that the existence of multiple standards led to consumer and supply chain confusion about, and lack of confidence in, these products. The National Organic Program Final Rule, issued in December 2000, is the result of this interest. We analyze the certification system that was in place prior to the new national rule to evaluate the extent of differences between certification standards and how the national rule is likely to impact the market for organic products. Our analysis suggests that most differences among US certification standards were minor. Also, the most important impacts of the national standard may be in facilitating trade in ingredients and products certified by different certifiers, increasing buyer confidence, and facilitating exports. However, the national rule may decrease the ability of organic certifiers and consumers to place differing emphasis on the multiple goals of organic production and may decrease the flexibility of organic standards to respond to changing market conditions, including new technologies.


Issue Date:
2002
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
Record Identifier:
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/25151
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/25151
Total Pages:
31
Series Statement:
Research Report No. 72




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2018-01-22

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