000023701 001__ 23701
000023701 005__ 20180122202600.0
000023701 037__ $$a1089-2016-87339
000023701 041__ $$aen
000023701 245__ $$aJOHN LOCKE AFTER 300 YEARS
000023701 260__ $$c2004
000023701 269__ $$a2004
000023701 270__ $$mJ.E.Alvey@massey.ac.nz$$pAlvey,   James E.
000023701 300__ $$a21
000023701 336__ $$aWorking or Discussion Paper
000023701 446__ $$aEnglish
000023701 490__ $$aDiscussion Paper 04.09
000023701 520__ $$aJohn Locke was a seminal figure in political philosophy and political economy and this year marks the tercentenary of his death. The paper focuses on the classical liberal interpretation of Locke. In this view, Locke defends individualism, natural rights (especially to property) and minimal government. After sketching this interpretation, I will present some extensions and applications of that interpretation. With this background in mind, I then turn to the views of critics who have claimed that Locke's individualism has been exaggerated and that Lockean rights are not absolute (they must be balanced against duties). Then I address the view of those who see Locke as a defender not of minimal government but of a more muscular (albeit limited) government. I then provide a brief conclusion.
000023701 650__ $$aPolitical Economy
000023701 700__ $$aAlvey, James E.
000023701 8564_ $$s330666$$uhttp://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/23701/files/dp040009.pdf
000023701 887__ $$ahttp://purl.umn.edu/23701
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  Previous issue date: 2004
000023701 982__ $$gMassey University>Department of Applied and International Economics>Discussion Papers
000023701 980__ $$a1089