Characteristics of hog producers and how those characteristics affect the rate of adoption of technologies used in the hog industry: Evidence from hog producers in the United States.

This paper mainly focuses on the adoption of a bundle of technologies as a group that works well together and is considered complementary to each other. We generated a correlation matrix and then performed a factor analysis on this correlation matrix. This correlation will be an indicator of complementary and substitute technologies. Besides, as these technologies mature, we want to determine how the relationship among technologies changes. In this manner, we can establish which unobservable factors that we are not measuring explain why some farmers are more likely to adopt certain bundles of technologies. The results of this study imply that producers with a higher level of education and high ages are more likely to adopt several bundles of technologies. Large production size is positively correlated with adopting the technologies as bundles. Human capital is a strong factor on the adoption of the technologies as bundles. Because the technologies are complementary, the productivity of one technology is enhanced by the adoption of the other technologies. We find that large farms run by younger and more educated operators are the most likely to adopt multiple technologies.


Issue Date:
May 25 2016
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/236196
Page range:
It is complicated to understand how advantages such as safety, convenience, welfare for pigs and operators, and simplicity can affect hog producer’s benefits received from adopting these technologies because not all hog producers in the United States have the same preferences. For instance, what may be proper and simple for one hog producer may be different for another hog producer.-We find that large farms run by younger and more educated operators are the most likely to adopt multiple technologies.
Total Pages:
31
Series Statement:
9104




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-29

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