SHED CLASSING VERSUS STORE CLASSING

Wool may be classed (i.e., grouped into reasonably uniform lots prior to sale) either immediately after shearing in the shearing shed or it may be packed into bales and sent to a wool store for classing. The second type of operation (especially when applied to relatively small quantities of wool) is known as bulk classing. With bulk classing the individual grower's wool loses its identity and is offered for sale in mixed lots. There are a number of other methods of preparation of wool for sale. Of these the only one which will be considered here specifically is "interlotting" which consists of shed classed bales from a number of growers being matched and sold as one lot. Interlotting is purely an operation to increase the size of lots (i.e., the number of bales per lot sold) so as to attract more competition from buyers or to reduce the valuing, inspection and bidding work of buyers and others


Issue Date:
1960-12
Publication Type:
Journal Article
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/22779
Published in:
Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Volume 04, Number 2
Page range:
115-120
Total Pages:
6




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-24

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