The Wage Earnings Impact of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

The impact on wages from blacks' attendance of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) versus other colleges is examined using geo-coded National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 data. The paper reconciles seemingly conflicting findings in previous studies by estimating wage profiles over time, rather than by estimating wages at a single point in time. Estimates indicate that black males show no initial wage advantage as a result of HBCU attendance, but their wages increase 1.4-1.5% faster per year after attending HBCUs compared to other colleges. This faster growth generates discounted career earnings from HBCU attendance that are 9.6% higher for HBCU attendees and 8.9% higher for the average four-year college black student. For black females, HBCU attendance has no significant impact on initial wages or on subsequent wage growth.


Issue Date:
2006
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/21471
Total Pages:
30
Note:
Paper removed by author. Please see the current version in the July 2008 issue of the Southern Economic Journal, Volume 75, Number 1, pages 173-187.
Series Statement:
Selected Paper




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-10-20


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