Managing the resilience of a common pool rangeland system in South Africa

Livestock production on South Africa’s commons strongly contributes to livelihoods of communal households offering status, food and income. Management innovations are generally top-down and informed by commercial practices such as rotational grazing in combination with conservative stocking. Implementations often ignore how the specific socio-ecological context affects outcomes and the impact on equity. Science now acknowledges that rangeland management must be context specific and a universally agreed-upon recommendation for managing semi-arid rangelands does not exist. We present a socio-ecological simulation model derived from a case study in South Africa. It is used to assess the socio-ecological effects of rotational vs. continuous grazing under conservative and opportunistic stocking rates. We find that continuous grazing under conservative stocking rates is best suited for the system under investigation. However, past legacy under apartheid and participants’ expectations render its successful application unlikely.

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Conference Paper/ Presentation
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JEL Codes:
Q15; Q58; Q13

 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2018-01-23

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