LAND LEASE MARKETS AND AGRICULTURAL EFFICIENCY: THEORY AND EVIDENCE FROM ETHIOPIA

This paper develops a theoretical model of land leasing that includes transaction costs of enforcing labor effort, risk pooling motives and non-tradable capital inputs. We test the implications of this model compared to those of the “"Marshallian”" (unenforceable labor effort) and “"New School”" (costlessly enforceable effort) perspectives using data collected from four villages in Ethiopia. We find that land lease markets operate relatively efficiently in the villages studied, supporting the New School perspective. Land contract choice is found to depend upon the social relationships between landlords and tenants, but differences in contracts are not associated with significant differences in input use or output value per hectare. We find that other household and village characteristics do affect input use and output value, suggesting imperfections in other factor markets.


Issue Date:
2002
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/19796
Total Pages:
27
Series Statement:
Selected Paper




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-24

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