How Effective Are Energy-Efficiency Incentive Programs? Evidence from Italian Homeowners

We evaluate incentives for residential energy upgrades in Italy using data from an original survey of Italian homeowners. In this paper, attention is restricted to heating system replacements, and to the effect of monetary and non-monetary incentives on the propensity to replace the heating equipment with a more efficient one. To get around adverse selection and free riding issues, we ask stated preference questions to those who weren’t planning energy efficiency upgrades any time soon. We argue that these persons are not affected by these behaviors. We use their responses to fit an energy-efficiency renovations curve that predicts the share of the population that will undertake these improvements for any given incentive level. This curve is used to estimate the CO2 emissions saved and their cost-effectiveness. Respondents are more likely to agree to a replacement when the savings on the energy bills are larger and experienced over a longer horizon, and when rebates are offered to them. Reminding about CO2 (our non-monetary incentive) had little effect. Even under optimistic assumptions, the cost-effectiveness of incentives of size comparable to that in the Italian tax credit program is generally not favorable.


Issue Date:
Nov 19 2014
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/189698
Total Pages:
41
JEL Codes:
Q41; Q48; Q54; Q51
Series Statement:
ERM
097.2014




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-28

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