SUPPLYING PRESERVATION: LANDOWNER BEHAVIOR AND THE DELAWARE AGRICULTURAL LANDS PRESERVATION PROGRAM

This report presents the results of a survey of Delaware agricultural landowners about their characteristics, opinions, and behavior regarding participation in the Delaware Agricultural Lands Preservation Program, specifically the PACE and Ag Dist programs. The results demonstrate that participants tend to: - Own larger farms - Be more likely to raise corn, soybeans, and vegetables - Have more decision makers - Be much more likely to be full-time operators - Be more likely to value working outdoors - Be more likely to value ownership to pass land onto children. The results also show that word of mouth is the most common way Delaware landowners learn about the DALP program. Owners' views about the DALP program were investigated. Key findings include: - Participants and nonparticipants identified preserving land for family as the most attractive aspect of the Ag Dist program - Both groups valued the Ag Dist program for its protection against agricultural nuisance suits and taxes - A majority of PACE participants found that program attractive to relieve pressure from debt, to provide retirement security, and to reinvest in their operations - A minority of Ag Dist participants and nonparticipants were interested in PACE to relieve pressure from debt. Participants had positive experiences with the DALP process. - Large majorities were satisfied with the DALP staff - Large majorities of PACE participants were satisfied with the DALP procedures and outcomes - A large majority of Ag Dist participants were satisfied with DALP procedures - A majority of Ag Dist participants were satisfied with the outcome - A large majority of participants would participate in Ag Dist if they had the chance to do it again - Most PACE participants are using PACE money for investments - Some PACE participants are using PACE money to pay debts.


Issue Date:
2004
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/15817
Total Pages:
59
Series Statement:
FREC Research Report RR04-01




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-24

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