IMPERIALISM AND COMPETITION IN ANTHROPOLOGY, SOCIOLOGY, POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS: A PERSPECTIVE FROM DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS

In work published in the 1980's Yujro Hayami and I elaborated a theory of institutional innovations in which institutional changes are induced, on the demand side, by changes in relative resource endowments and technical change and, on the supply side, by changes in cultural endowments and advances in social science knowledge. In the mid-1980's I initiated a research program to explore what development economists might learn from research by other social scientists working in the field of development. In this paper I draw on this earlier work, and on related literature to explore the conditions under which interdisciplinary imperialism or interdisciplinary collaboration can be most productive. I argue that when the objective of research is to advance fundamental knowledge in the social sciences imperialism can be highly productive. But where multiple sources of knowledge must be drawn on for policy, mechanism, or system design interdisciplinary collaboration is essential.


Issue Date:
2000
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/12978
Total Pages:
28
JEL Codes:
O30
Series Statement:
Bulletin 00-2




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-23

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