000124496 001__ 124496
000124496 005__ 20180122221304.0
000124496 037__ $$a653-2016-44570
000124496 041__ $$aen_US
000124496 245__ $$aA Viable Biofuels Industry in Australia?
000124496 260__ $$c2007-08-15
000124496 269__ $$a2007-08-15
000124496 300__ $$a7
000124496 336__ $$aConference Paper/ Presentation
000124496 390__ $$aTransport fuels in Australia are overwhelmingly
based on petroleum products; petrol, diesel and
LPG are the primary fuels. The concept of ‘peak
oil’ is now within the arena of public debate with
the realisation that this will result in rapidly increasing
oil, and therefore transport fuel, prices. When
this is coupled with instability in areas of the world
that contain most relatively easily extractable oil
reserves, and hence supply security issues, at
least two drivers for the exploration of alternative
transport fuel supplies are clear.
One alternative to supply at least the part of Australia’s
future transport fuels is the range of
biofuels that can be made from agricultural products
such as sugar, wheat and oilseeds. There
are, however, a myriad of issues associated with
that simple statement. These include:
• how much of Australia’s fuel needs can be met
from biofuels?
• the potential competition between food and
‘energy’ crops
• do we have the water/soil quality to make the
impact required?
• how do biofuels compare with alternatives
such as gas and coal conversion to liquids?
• would a carbon price enhance the uptake of
biofuels?
• is there a role for genetic modification of
energy crops?
• what is the impact of ‘second generation’
conversion technology?
• what policy regime should be adopted to
optimise biofuels viability?
From the above incomplete random list of issues, it
can be seen that they are a complex mix of economics,
technology and policy.
This paper examines the current state of the biofuels
industry in Australia and explores possible
futures for the biofuels industry in the light of the
issues above.
000124496 500__ $$aTransport fuels in Australia are overwhelmingly
based on petroleum products; petrol, diesel and
LPG are the primary fuels. The concept of ‘peak
oil’ is now within the arena of public debate with
the realisation that this will result in rapidly increasing
oil, and therefore transport fuel, prices. When
this is coupled with instability in areas of the world
that contain most relatively easily extractable oil
reserves, and hence supply security issues, at
least two drivers for the exploration of alternative
transport fuel supplies are clear.
One alternative to supply at least the part of Australia’s
future transport fuels is the range of
biofuels that can be made from agricultural products
such as sugar, wheat and oilseeds. There
are, however, a myriad of issues associated with
that simple statement. These include:
• how much of Australia’s fuel needs can be met
from biofuels?
• the potential competition between food and
‘energy’ crops
• do we have the water/soil quality to make the
impact required?
• how do biofuels compare with alternatives
such as gas and coal conversion to liquids?
• would a carbon price enhance the uptake of
biofuels?
• is there a role for genetic modification of
energy crops?
• what is the impact of ‘second generation’
conversion technology?
• what policy regime should be adopted to
optimise biofuels viability?
From the above incomplete random list of issues, it
can be seen that they are a complex mix of economics,
technology and policy.
This paper examines the current state of the biofuels
industry in Australia and explores possible
futures for the biofuels industry in the light of the
issues above.
000124496 542__ $$fLicense granted by Kirsten Olson (olso5834@umn.edu) on 2012-06-01T16:51:03Z (GMT):

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000124496 650__ $$aResource /Energy Economics and Policy
000124496 700__ $$aWright, John
000124496 8564_ $$s698199$$uhttp://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/124496/files/Wright%202007.pdf
000124496 887__ $$ahttp://purl.umn.edu/124496
000124496 909CO $$ooai:ageconsearch.umn.edu:124496$$pGLOBAL_SET
000124496 912__ $$nSubmitted by Kirsten Olson (olso5834@umn.edu) on 2012-06-01T16:52:18Z
No. of bitstreams: 1
Wright 2007.pdf: 698199 bytes, checksum: ec5b6146d6d49dd760cfb3d4f196cab5 (MD5)
000124496 912__ $$nMade available in DSpace on 2012-06-01T16:52:20Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1
Wright 2007.pdf: 698199 bytes, checksum: ec5b6146d6d49dd760cfb3d4f196cab5 (MD5)
  Previous issue date: 2007-08-15
000124496 982__ $$gCrawford Fund>Conference Proceedings>2007: Biofuels, Energy and Agriculture: Powering Towards or Away from Food Security?, 15 August 2007
000124496 980__ $$a653