Geograpical Indications, Barriers to Market Access and Preferential Trade Agreements

Public policy makers in Canada should expect the US to object to the extension of protection to EU GIs in the CETA. The expected gains made in other areas of the CETA for agreeing to protect EU GIs need to be weighed carefully against the potential cost of trade actions through NAFTA. The NAFTA has relatively strong commitments pertaining to intellectual property, although they remain largely untested. In the case of geographical indicators, the NAFTA commitments are structured around the trademark system used by the US and Canada. Other aspects of the NAFTA, such as the investment provisions, may also be used to challenge the negative impact of Canada granting intellectual property protection to GIs.


Keywords:
Issue Date:
2012-03
Publication Type:
Report
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/122743
Total Pages:
4
Series Statement:
CATPRN Trade Policy Brief
2012-01




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-04-24

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