Effects of Family, Friends, and Relative Prices on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption by African American Youths

Facilitating healthy eating among young people, particularly among minorities who are at high risk for gaining excess weight, is at the forefront of current policy discussions and food program reviews. We investigate the effects of social interactions and relative prices on fruit and vegetable consumption by African American youths using rich behavioral data from the Family and Community Health Study and area-specific food prices. We find the presence of endogenous effects between a youth and parent, but not between a youth and friend. Lower relative prices of fruits and vegetables tend to increase intakes. Results suggest that health interventions targeting a family member may be an effective way to increase fruit and vegetable intake by African Americans as a result of "spillover" consumption effects between the youths and parents.


Issue Date:
Jun 01 2011
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/107086
Total Pages:
46
JEL Codes:
I12; J15; C35; Q18
Note:
Paper for presentation at the Northeastern Agricultural & Resource Economics Association’s Workshop on Economics and Child Nutrition Programs, AAEA & NAREA Joint Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July 23, 2011.




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-26

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