000103643 001__ 103643
000103643 005__ 20180122215108.0
000103643 037__ $$a321-2016-10954
000103643 041__ $$aen
000103643 084__ $$aI32
000103643 084__ $$aJ22
000103643 084__ $$aD13
000103643 084__ $$aD63
000103643 245__ $$aPeer Effect, Risk-Pooling and Status Seeking: Which Matters to Gift Spending Escalation in Rural China?
000103643 260__ $$c2011-05
000103643 269__ $$a2011-05
000103643 270__ $$mxc49@cornell.edu$$pChen,   Xi
000103643 270__ $$mx.zhang@cigar.org$$pZhang,   Xiaobo
000103643 300__ $$a39
000103643 336__ $$aConference Paper/ Presentation
000103643 390__ $$aThis paper is based on our ongoing joint work with Ravi Kanbur. Xi Chen is grateful to Ravi Kanbur for invaluable comments, guidance and encouragement. For comments and suggestions, please direct correspondence to Xi Chen at xc49@cornell.edu.
000103643 390__ $$aReplaced with revised version of paper 07/22/11.
000103643 490__ $$aSelected Paper for China Section Track Session "Rural China in the New Era: Subsidy, Credit and Land"
000103643 500__ $$aThis paper is based on our ongoing joint work with Ravi Kanbur. Xi Chen is grateful to Ravi Kanbur for invaluable comments, guidance and encouragement. For comments and suggestions, please direct correspondence to Xi Chen at xc49@cornell.edu.
000103643 500__ $$aReplaced with revised version of paper 07/22/11.
000103643 520__ $$aIt has been widely documented that the poor spend a significant proportion of their income on gifts even at the expense of basic consumption. We test three competing explanations to this phenomenon, peer effect, status concern, and risk-pooling, based on a census-type primary household survey in three natural villages in rural China and detailed household records of gifts received in major occasions. The gift giving behavior is largely influenced by peers in the reference groups. Status concern is another key motive for “keeping up with the Joneses” in extending gifts. In particular, the poor with sons spend more on gift giving in proportion to their income than their rich counterparts in response to the tightening marriage market. In contrast, risk pooling does not seem to be a key driver of the observed gift giving patterns. Large windfall income to a large extent triggers the escalation of gift giving behavior.
000103643 542__ $$fLicense granted by Xi Chen (xc49@cornell.edu) on 2011-05-03T06:15:43Z (GMT):

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000103643 650__ $$aAgricultural and Food Policy
000103643 650__ $$aAgricultural Finance
000103643 650__ $$aCommunity/Rural/Urban Development
000103643 650__ $$aConsumer/Household Economics
000103643 650__ $$aDemand and Price Analysis
000103643 650__ $$aFood Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
000103643 650__ $$aFood Security and Poverty
000103643 650__ $$aInstitutional and Behavioral Economics
000103643 650__ $$aInternational Development
000103643 650__ $$aPublic Economics
000103643 650__ $$aResearch Methods/ Statistical Methods
000103643 650__ $$aRisk and Uncertainty
000103643 6531_ $$aSocial Network
000103643 6531_ $$aPeer Effect
000103643 6531_ $$aRisk-pooling
000103643 6531_ $$aStatus Seeking
000103643 6531_ $$aGift-giving
000103643 6531_ $$aCeremony
000103643 700__ $$aChen, Xi
000103643 700__ $$aZhang, Xiaobo
000103643 8564_ $$s1044082$$uhttp://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/103643/files/AAEA2011PittsburghPaper-103643.pdf
000103643 887__ $$ahttp://purl.umn.edu/103643
000103643 909CO $$ooai:ageconsearch.umn.edu:103643$$pGLOBAL_SET
000103643 912__ $$nSubmitted by Xi Chen (xc49@cornell.edu) on 2011-05-03T06:32:06Z
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  Previous issue date: 2011-05
000103643 982__ $$gAgricultural and Applied Economics Association>2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
000103643 980__ $$a321