Behavioral Economics, Food Assistance, and Obesity

While there is mixed evidence of the impact of food assistance programs on obesity, there is general agreement that the food-insecure are at higher risk of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Food assistance programs, originally designed to overcome a lack of available food, now need to confront a very different problem: how to provide for the food-insecure while encouraging healthy lifestyles. This paper examines the potential to address these competing needs using traditional economic policies (manipulating information or prices) versus policies engaging behavioral economics and psychology.


Issue Date:
2006-10
Publication Type:
Journal Article
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/10220
Published in:
Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Volume 35, Number 2
Page range:
209-220
Total Pages:
12




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-23

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